READ TO ME FOUNDATION -
I AM READING A BOOK ABOUT ANTI-GRAVITY.....AND I JUST CAN'T PUT IT DOWN 
MISSION
 
 
 
*To help disadvantaged and under-served children discover the joy of reading and speaking in both English and Spanish through the distribution of FREE bilingual (English-Spanish) children books.
 
 Gary Simpson, Board of Director/Read To Read Foundation, reading a Read To Me book to his grand children
  
*To encourage reading as a lifetime event!
          OUR IMPACT 2009-2014
                                        Books Distributed                16,750
 

          

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WOW! MY BABY CAN READ!
 
Why Read to My Baby?
 
Reading aloud to your baby is a wonderful shared activity you can continue for years to come — and it's an important form of stimulation.


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Reading aloud:
  *teaches a baby about communication
 
  *introduces concepts such as stories, numbers, letters, colors, and shapes in a fun way
 
  *builds listening, memory, and vocabulary skills  
  *gives babies information about the world around them                       
                                                                                          
  *The more stories you read aloud, the more words your child will be exposed to and the better he or she will be able to talk.
 
  *Holding your baby and sharing a book is a very special time.
 
  *Babies learn that reading is important when you hold them, and show them pictures in a book, and you talk about the pictures.
 
 
   *Babies enjoy being read to because they like the sound of your voice and they like having you close for some special time together.
 
   *Babies enjoy looking at the pictures and listening to the rhythm of your voice long before they can understand the words.
 
   *Children whose parents read books to them when they are young often learn to speak, read and write more easily.
 
   *When reading, try to look both at the book and your baby. Point to the pictures and talk about the things your baby is looking at.
 
   *When reading aloud, try to use your voice in many ways to make the story-time as interesting for your baby as possible - loud and soft, happy and sad.
 
   *If you find books your baby loves, read them over and over and try to use the same reading voice each time so they get used to the pattern.
 
 
BIRTH TO 6 MONTHS OLD
Newborns are calmed by the rhythmic sounds of lullabies and nursery rhymes. These will be their first stories. Your baby may even begin to recognize a song or rhyme if you repeat it often. By the time she is 4 months old, your baby will show an interest in books and start to explore them by chewing or throwing them. At this age, your baby needs sturdy vinyl or cloth books that can survive chewing and are not easily torn.
 
 
BIRTH TO 6 MONTHS OLD
Babies are just learning to use their hands. At first, your baby will not be able to grasp objects by himself, but he will awkwardly grasp a toy placed in his palm. Your 4-to 6-month-old baby can reach for and grasp things he wants. Babies will explore objects by putting them in their mouths.
 
 
6 TO 12 MONTHS OLD
During this period, babies become less interested in mouthing books and more interested in the story. You can promote your baby's interest in books by looking at books with him and talking about the pictures, especially those that interest your baby. Invite your 8- or 9-month-old baby to turn the pages. If you are raising your baby to become bilingual, this is a good time to introduce objects to your baby and tell her the words for them in both languages.
 
 
12 TO 18 MONTHS OLD
Babies delight in reading together with adults. Your baby will turn pages and name pictures of familiar objects. She may begin to enjoy books that tell simple stories. Because babies are natural explorers, they love books like Pat the Bunny, which they can touch and sniff while listening to the story.
 
12 TO 18 MONTHS OLD
Babies have developed the hand skills necessary for grasping writing tools and making marks on paper. Only at the very end of infancy, at 17 or 18 months, will your baby begin to become interested in writing. You should not expect pictures or even "coloring," let alone letters, from your baby. By scribbling, your baby explores what he can do with crayons and paper and tries to imitate what he sees older children and parents do.
 
 
 
 
"A book is the most effective
 weapon
against intolerance
 and
ignorance" LBJ
 
 
 
 
JOIN THE FIGHT FOR LITERACY
 
 
"A baby's brain thrives on stimulation and develops at a phenomenal pace, nearly 90% during the first five years of life! The best and easiest time to learn a language is during the infant and toddler years,when the brain is creating thousands of synapses, or connections, allowing a child to learn both the written word and spoken word simultaneously. " www.yourbabycanread.com
 
 
 
 
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